Saturday, October 01, 2022

Women and Entrepreneurs of Color Are Flocking to Entrepreneurship

What's the biggest rival for businesses?  Self-employed individuals, better known as entrepreneurs.  They are creating jobs and economic opportunity.

According to recent research by Gusto in its New Business Owner Survey, 36% of entrepreneurs said they started their business after voluntarily quitting their job. 

One of the key trends from the survey is that women and entrepreneurs of color are flocking to entrepreneurship.  

Founders of new businesses were much likely to be Black, Hispanic, and female in 2020 and 2021 than in 2019. In 2019, 28% of new business owners were women, versus 49% in 2021. And in 2019, Black or African American entrepreneurs made up less than 3% of entrepreneurs; by 2021 that share had tripled to 9%.

New business creation is making a comeback.  Why not control your destiny?

Saturday, September 24, 2022

Women Business Owners Are Making History, Always

Women-owned businesses are essential to economic stability and recovery and supporting them is a smart economic decision.

Women are making history as the primary breadwinners for their families while also leading about 40% of households. With these factors combined, supporting small businesses owned by women from all socioeconomic groups means supporting companies that contribute to local economies and provide good jobs.

Read on to learn how continuing to empower women-owned businesses will strengthen our global economy.

Saturday, September 17, 2022

How HER Side Hustle Makes $15,000 a Month

TikToker, Yamie Michelin, broke down how she's been able to make $15,000 a month by selling merchandise from discount retailer Marshalls on Amazon for a much higher price.

Michelin, who goes by @yamie_the_realtor on TikTok with no less than 41.5K followers and 820.8K Likes, first said she searches for products at discount stores. In one example, she purchased two primers from Sephora that she found at Marshalls for $3.99 and resold the items for $22.54 each.

Some sellers have even seemed to crack a code by outsourcing products from wholesale companies or discount retailers where they can buy bulk products cheaper and then resell them for a higher price, turning a profit without minimum effort.

Is it ethical?  

Is it ethical or fair when 7-Eleven charges $1.39 for a can of Campbell's Chicken Noodle soup and the Dollar Store charges 99 cents?

Read on to learn how Yamie's side hustle passively makes $15,000 each month.  

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Chicago-based Bluedog is a Top 100 Finalist Again for Crain's Top Places to Work 2022

How do you strengthen your company to be a best place to work? Chicago-based Bluedog's CEO Michelle Hayward has the answer. For the fifth consecutive year Bluedog, a certified B Corp, has been recognized by Crain's Chicago Business as a Top Place to Work.  Bluedog claimed the No. 1 position in 2021.

“Being among the Top 100 Places to Work during the ongoing pandemic feels particularly meaningful,” said Michelle Hayward, Bluedog’s CEO. “From the start, we built a supportive culture, and the last two years proved the trust-building ways of working and mutuality we developed. We all grew and evolved around this moment together.”

About Bluedog

Bluedog Design is a dynamic marketing and growth consultancy founded in 1999. Globally recognized as a leading innovation partner, Bluedog helps large, complex organizations (many of them household names) find the clarity to make strategic decisions that land in growth. Since 2020, the company has also been a Certified B Corporation, accountable for advancing sustainability, transparency and ethics to make business a force for good in the world.

Read more:  Bluedog Is A Crain’s Chicago Finalist For Top Place To Work – Again

Saturday, September 10, 2022

Knowledge, Networks and Access: Academy for Women Entrepreneurs (AWE)

Have you ever had this happen and reacted similarly?

“When they called to tell me about my acceptance, the first thing I said was ‘I think you have the wrong person,’” she [Cathy Perugachi, co-founder of e-commerce business, Quipu Pallay] recounts. 

Academy for Women Entrepreneurs alumna Cathy Perugachi is an Ecuadorian fashionista who is helping women redefine their self-image from the inside out.

Perugachi says that participating in a U.S. Embassy-led initiative like AWE is prestigious thanks to its proximity to the U.S. business community. "It is not just any type of network, it gives you a golden pass to boost not only your business but also your professional growth,” she says. “It gives you a sense of name recognition and legitimacy.” 

The Academy for Women Entrepreneurs (AWE), a program of the U.S. Department of State, gives women the knowledge, networks, and access they need to launch and scale successful businesses.

Learn more at:  A Bridge Between: Creating Opportunities for Women Entrepreneurs

Saturday, September 03, 2022

Lead With Compassion

Compassion, the cornerstone of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), isn’t always afforded to women entrepreneurs, who often face barriers to progress in the workplace — and in other aspects of society. 

Women entrepreneurs perhaps know better than most how essential compassion in the workplace truly is. Cultivating a compassionate environment not only helps women entrepreneurs manage their own businesses and personal life with more balance and ease but also fosters an environment of diversity that helps other women and under-represented groups succeed.

Discover 4 types of compassion women entrepreneurs can cultivate to navigate trying times in business and in life.

Saturday, August 27, 2022

Black Women Entrepreneurs Give Their Best Startup Advice

These badass business owners featured in the article below are changing the game from skincare, to life coaching, to mental health-conscious apparel.

When Black women are still making 63 cents for every dollar a white man makes, it’s imperative that we support each other – whether that’s through a purchase, a referral, an Instagram follow, or a retweet. When one of us comes up, we all come up!

Here, five entrepreneurs are asked about their mission, and what it means to them to be a Black woman entrepreneur.  They also share  advice for the next class of melanated moguls.